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International Tea Day: Best street joints in Delhi for chai lovers

To celebrate the popularity of tea, the United Nations Food and Agricultural Association has marked May 21 as International Tea Day. As we celebrate International Tea Day, here are some local chai tapris that you must visit once in a lifetime

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As we celebrate International Tea Day, here are local chai tapris that you must visit once in a lifetime.

Tea is not only a beverage but it’s an emotion. A cup of tea not only wakes you up on lazy mornings, but it also goes well with evening conversations. A sip of tea with butter biscuits, rusks, or freshly fried samosa always enhances the taste of the snack. But did you know that there is a day dedicated to tea and tea lovers?

To celebrate the popularity of tea, the United Nations Food and Agricultural Association has marked May 21 as International Tea Day. As we celebrate International Tea Day, here are some local chai tapris that you must visit once in a lifetime.

  1. Sudama Tea Stall

Sudama Tea Stall has students line up with flasks in the mornings, while vehicles of all kinds line up in the evenings for a cup of the magical masala chai. The chai is strong and flavorful, with substantial amounts of handmade masala, ginger, and cardamom. Sudama chacha or mamaji (uncle), as he is affectionately known, is a tea vendor with a huge social media following.

Location: Next to Ramjas College
Price: Rs 10

  1. JP Tea Stall

This stall serves masala tea, iced tea, lemon tea, and other tea varieties. Tea aficionados from all over campus come to this eatery, which offers tea in transparent cups. According to Deepu bhaiya, who manages the stall, recommends people try his iced tea and not only masala tea. He also said that lemon tea is preferred by those who like fancy things.

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Location: Delhi School of Economics, North Campus
Price: Rs 8

  1. Netaji Chai Wala

The name Netaji Chai wale comes from the fact that the owner of this tea shop contested against other parties in an election and lost, and the rest is history. Now he serves delicious chai in front of the Hanuman Mandir in CP, and everyone loves it.

Location: Prachin Hanuman Mandir, Connaught Place
Price: Rs 40

  1. Khan Tea Stall

Khan Saab, the owner of this stand, serves cardamom-infused chai with Maggi, eggs, biscuits, and cream rolls. Extra love, extra milk, and the perfect amount of sugar are the simple ingredients in this tea.

Location: Patel Chest Institute
Price: Rs 10

  1. Pandit Ji Ki Chai

Not only does this chaiwallah profess to serve the strongest tea, but he also claims to be up to date on the latest happenings at the university. Pandit Ji’s son, Aashish, makes a delicious masala chai with a kick of ginger and cardamom.

Location: Arts Faculty, Delhi University
Price: Rs 10

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Lifestyle

Shashi Tharoor turns 67: A look at India’s most eminent logophile and his Twitter world

Shashi Tharoor is celebrating his 67th birthday today, know how he became the wordsmith the world knows today.

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The author, diplomat, and Congress leader Shashi Tharoor has always excited the Twitter world by tweeting rarely-used words from the English vocabulary.

Shashi Tharoor is one of the most liked orators, not just in India but also abroad. He engages the Twitter world every now and then by educating people with exotic words and their meanings.

People have always been in awe of his extensive vocabulary and command over the English language. No matter his political stance, social media users are always intrigued by his expressions, wit, and fluency while he speaks.

When asked in an interview about how he acquired this vocabulary, he said it was just through the habit of reading books. He added that he has barely opened a dictionary in all his life, as people tend to assume that he reads dictionaries all day long.

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Here are the most talked about tweets by Tharoor

Starting with the one that became national news and invited a lot of comical memes all over the internet:

In 2022, he shared his word of the era, “doom-scrolling” and created a buzz on social media:

The time when he agreed to author Chetan Bhagat’s request of using bigger words to praise him:

Some unique English words by Shashi Tharoor

Floccinaucinihilipilification
The word means the action or habit of estimating something as worthless.

Ostentation
Ostentation’ means to be a pretentious or showy display of wealth and luxury, designed to impress.

Hippopotomonstrosesquipedaliophobia
The head-scratcher was thrown by Shashi Tharoor in 2018. It’s just a word describing a fear of long words, said Tharoor while explaining the meaning of the word.

Born in the United Kingdom, Former Under Secretary General of the United Nations, Shashi Tharoor was the most followed Indian on Twitter before being overtaken by Narendra Modi.

He is also a Sahitya Academy Awardee and has published many works of fiction and non-fiction since 1981, based on the themes of India and its history, culture, film, politics, society, and foreign policy.

He has also published many columns, stories and articles in many major publications in India and the world.

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Lifestyle

Holi 2023: Easy essay and speech ideas to win competition

Holi celebrates the arrival of Spring (season) in India, the end of winter, and the blossoming of love, and for many, it is a festive day to meet others, play and laugh, forget and forgive, and repair broken relationships.

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Holi 2023: Easy essay and speech ideas to win competition

Holi is one of the most popular and significant festivals in Hinduism. Also known as the Festival of Colours, it is a festival of joy and love and is fervently celebrated in the Indian subcontinent. The festival signifies the triumph of good over evil.

Holi celebrates the arrival of Spring (season) in India, the end of winter, and the blossoming of love, and for many, it is a festive day to meet others, play and laugh, forget and forgive, and repair broken relationships. The festival is also an invocation for a good spring harvest season. This year, Holi is being celebrated on March 8.

Holi is celebrated with great zeal and enthusiasm in schools and colleges. Students take part in dance competitions, skits, essay and speech competitions and other events. So, if you have taken part in an essay competition and are looking for easy essay and speech ideas for Holi then you have landed at the right place.

Holi essays and speech

Holi is one of the great festivals of India which is celebrated with great zeal, zest, and enthusiasm. It is also called the festival of colors during which people play with colors and splash colors on each other. Holi also signifies the triumph of good over evil as this was the day when evil king Hiranyakashyap was slayed by Narasimha, the half man and half lion incarnation of Lord Vishnu and saved Prahlad who was a devotee of him.

The celebration of Holi starts several days before the festival when people start buying colors, balloons, food items for the preparation of cuisines etc. Children are the ones who are very much excited for Holi and start celebrating it in advance by splashing colors on their friends using water cannons or ‘pichkaris’. Markets around the cities and villages get decorated with ‘gulals’, colors, ‘pichkaris’ etc.

Holi is also a festival of harmony where friends and relatives get together in the evening or visit their friends, family and neighbours and greet them with colors and sweets. The mouth-watering delicacies of Holi like ‘gujiya’, ‘laddoos’, and ‘thandai’ add a flavor to the season of festivity. People hug each other on Holi and give a new beginning by forgetting all their hatreds and sorrows.


Holi is a festival of color celebrated by Hindus all over India. The Hindus celebrate Holi as a festival of love and happiness, in which they shed animosity, greed, and hatred in order to embrace a new life of love and togetherness.

Holi festival is celebrated in the spring season, during the month of Phalgun in the Hindu calendar, which usually corresponds with the Gregorian calendar month of March or occasionally late February. It is a two-day festival that begins with Holika Dahan on a full moon night. The main Holi festival occurs the day following Holika Dahan. It also coincides with the wheat harvest and is associated with prosperity and happiness.

People splash watercolours on each other during the day. To celebrate the festival, children use water cannons or ‘pichkari’ to throw watercolours. People dress up in attractive attire and visit their friends and relatives in the evening, hugging them with ‘gulal,’ the dry colors. People also sing folk songs and dance to popular Holi songs.


Known as the festival of color, Holi is celebrated in the month of March. It marks the beginning of spring every year. This festival is also called the ‘Festival of Love’ as people forget all their resentments towards each other and celebrate together. It is celebrated by people who believe in Hinduism but the occasion is enjoyed all across the country irrespective of religious beliefs.

People celebrate this day by lighting bonfires, which honours the triumph of good over evil. Families and friends all unite to play with colors. People carry drums and other musical instruments and then go from place to place to sing and dance. People visit each other’s houses with sweets, colors and importantly, love. Usually, the festival is celebrated for three days. It starts with the rituals of Holika Dahan, Choti Holi and the final day of Holi celebrations. People dance to traditional folk music and play with gulal.

The Holi rituals begin with the destruction of evil symbolized through a bonfire and end with colors, prayers, dance, food, and blessings. The colors used in Holi reflect different emotions, blue is for Lord Krishna, red is for fertility and love, and green is for new beginnings and the surroundings in which we stay.


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Holi songs 2023: From Holi Aayi Re to Holiya Mein Ude Re Gulal, songs to groove on

Here is the list of Holi songs that you must play during the celebration.

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Holi songs 2023: From Holi Aayi Re to Holiya Mein Ude Re Gulal, songs to groove on

Holi is here and people are ready to slip into their white outfits and splash vibrant colours and binge on mouth-watering gujiyas. Preparations for Holi are underway and it’s that time of the year when people meet each other, play and laugh, forget and forgive, and repair broken relationships.

No matter how many tubs you fill with water balloons or enjoy a festival of colours with a bit of bhaang, one thing will always be incomplete without one essential component which is Bollywood songs to groove on. Bollywood songs are the only thing that can enhance an Indian festival’s glory.

This year, Holi will be celebrated on March 8. Here is the list of Holi songs that you must play during the celebration.

Do Me A Favour Let’s Play Holi

Rang Barse Bheegi Chunarwaali


Holi Aayi Re

Jogi Ji Dheere Dheere

Balam Pichkari

Holi Khele Raghuveera

Holiya Mein Ude Re Gulal

Lahu Munh Lag Gaya

Jai Jai Shiv Shankar

Gori Tu Latth Maar

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